What does "________" mean? How is it used in a sentence?
   
 

book

 

Learn English  
  Blue Level  
  Red Level  
  Yellow Level  
  Green Level  
  Purple Level  
  Orange Level  
  Violet Level  
  Video Lessons  
  Links  
  American Speech  
  Chat  
  How to Learn  
  Vocabulary  
  U.S. Citizenship  
  Reading  

 

 

 

 


 
 

weak

 

A person or a thing that does not have strength or power is weak. This word is the opposite of the word "strong."

We often use "weak" to describe people:

  • She became weak after a long illness.
  • A weak, old man was brought to the hospital.
  • Babies are weak and powerless soon after they are born.
  • Will was tired of looking skinny and weak, so he began to lift weights.
  • Three days of the flu left me feeling weak.

The word "weak" also describes animals and things:

  • A weak storm moved through our area.
  • A weak foundation caused the house to collapse.
  • The dogs legs were so weak it couldn't stand.
  • Her excuse for being late was kind of weak. (It was a bad excuse)
  • Sales figures for this last quarter have been weak.

To make this word into a verb, add an "en" ending:

  • She was weakened by her illness.
  • Smoking weakens your immune system.
  • Hurricanes weaken once they hit land.
  • Avoiding exercise will weaken your muscles.

Add "ling" to the end of "weak" to form the noun, "weakling." (weakling: a person who is weak)

  • Randy is too much of a weakling to be a threat to anyone.

a weak manRandy needs to work out.

 

Click here to learn more words.

 

 

This page was first published on January 23, 2014.

 

Home | Your Teacher | Contact | Privacy Policy | Site Map | Terms Of Use

 

 

 

 

 

© 2014 Learn American English Online. All rights reserved.