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May 25, 2014 - Word of the Day: bit

 

The word "bit" is a noun that is used for an amount. A large amount is quite a bit; a small amount is a little bit or a tiny bit. A bit (all by itself) can be large or small.

  • I'll see you in a little bit. (a short time)
  • Their company made quite a bit of money last year. (a large amount of money)
  • She needs a bit of time to consider her decision. (some time, maybe a long time)
  • "This will hurt a little bit," said the nurse as she vaccinated her patient.
  • He knows quite a bit about computers. (He knows a lot about computers.)
  • They'll need a bit of time to find new jobs.
  • She's a bit angry at her boss. (a little angry)
  • I'll have just a tiny bit of that cake--not too much.

Notice that "bit" is usually used with the article "a."

There are a few other ways to use the word "bit."

  • Drill bits are attached to a drill when drilling holes in wood, metal, or concrete.
drill bits
  • A person controls a horse through the placement of a bit that goes in the horse's mouth. The bit is attached to the reins.
horse
  • A bit can be a short performance. He's doing a ten-minute comedy bit.
performer

The word "bit" is also the past tense of the verb "bite."

simple past past participle
bite
bit
bitten
  • Sarah bit into her sandwich.
  • Jimmy bit his little brother.
  • I accidentally bit my tongue.

 

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