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November 10, 2011 - Word of the Day

spot

 

You can use the word "spot" many different ways.

As a noun, it can be a location or a place:

  • This is a great spot for lunch.
  • Ted knows of a good spot for catching fish.
  • Try to park the car in a good spot.

But a "spot" can also be a mistake, dots, a blemish, or something that has spilled:

  • There's a spot on my shirt. I think it's from spaghetti sauce.
  • Helga has little red spots all over her legs. It's probably a rash.
  • After I got hit in the head, I saw spots before my eyes. (This would be an optical illusion caused by a blow to the head.)

bug

This bug has spots on its back.

When the word "spot" is used as a verb, it's similar to the verb "see."

  • If you spot any good sales at the store, let me know.
  • We spotted a few celebrities as we were walking along Fifth Avenue in New York.

The phrase "on the spot" is very popular. It has a few different meanings:

  • Immediately after the robbery, the police were on the spot. (on the spot = to arrive immediately)
  • Your answer is on the spot. (on the spot = correct)
  • The teacher put Jose on the spot when he asked the young man a question. He didn't have an answer. (on the spot = in an awkward position)

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