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miss

 

The word "miss" has a few different meanings when it's used as a verb.

In the first set of examples, to miss something or someone is to wish for it because it's no longer there or it's in a distant location or time. Do not use continuous verbs (ing) for these situations.

  • Ankita misses her boyfriend who moved to Europe.
  • Edgar misses his parents now that he's living in the United States.
  • Yolanda and Juan missed seeing each other when they were apart, but now they're back together again.
  • Now that you're married, what do you miss most about being single?
  • I miss the carefree days of my youth.

A slightly different use for "miss" is when you can't find something. In this case, continuous verbs are common:

  • This puzzle is missing a few pieces.
  • The store is missing a few thousand dollars.
  • She's missing a front tooth.
  • You're missing an assignment. Where is it?
  • The police are looking for a missing child. (In this sentence, "missing" is an adjective.)

If you attempt to hit or throw something but are not successful, you miss it.

  • Bobby swung at the ball and missed.
  • Sheila tried to throw the cabbage into the garbage, but her aim was bad and she missed. The cabbage fell to the floor.
  • That guy is a terrible basketball player. He always misses the basket.
  • The forward missed the goal.

archerHe missed the target.

If you schedule an appointment, a meeting, or a service of some kind but you can't make it or you don't go, you miss it.

  • Larissa missed her flight to New York. She'll have to get on another plane.
  • Charles has been missing a lot of meetings lately.
  • You missed your appointment. You'll have to reschedule.
  • Try not to miss any more classes.
  • I'm sorry I missed the party. Was it fun?

There's one other important use for the word "miss" which is completely different from its use as a verb. The word "miss" is a title for a woman who is not married.

unmarried married ?
Miss
Mrs.
Ms.
  • Our teacher is Miss Rickenbacker. (She's not married. She's single.)
  • The principal's name is Mrs. Fender (She's married)
  • Ms. Gibson is a lawyer. (We don't know if she's married or single. Professional women often choose "Ms.")

Click here to go to the Word of the Day page.

March 28, 2015

 

 

 

 

 

 

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