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blister

 

A blister forms on a part of the body that is exposed to repeated friction or back and forth movement. Blisters form on hands and feet from repetitive work activity or from walking.

  • Joe has a blister on his heel because he walked five miles today.
  • One of the reasons for wearing socks on your feet is to avoid getting blisters.
  • Rachel has blisters on her fingers because she played the guitar for several hours last night.
  • It's a good idea to wear gloves when raking leaves; otherwise, you might get blisters on your hands.
  • I've got blisters on my fingers!

foot

The word "blistering" is sometimes used as an adverb or an adjective in place of "very."

  • It's blistering hot outside today. (It's very hot.)
  • A few people fainted in the blistering heat. (In this and the following sentences, "blistering" is an adjective.)
  • The runner broke yet another world record with his blistering speed on the track.
  • The construction project was completed with blistering speed.
  • The skin on her back is blistering from a sunburn. (In this sentence, "blistering" is a verb.)

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August 3, 2016

 

 

 

 

 

 

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